Should I Quit My Day Job and Work Online?

Interesting question, and the one that I believe many people share. If you ask  the financial advisors Geraldton about this, I’m pretty sure they will get a heart attack.

 

The response will depend on your current situation. For anyone who is young (e. g., up to 30 years old) and do not have many financial duties (e. g., no wife, no kids, no mortgages) then you may consider moving over as soon as your website starts making 40 % of your current income. Perhaps even less if you already know the ropes of sites marketing and know your site has potential.

 

When We quit my full time job I was twenty-two, and my sites were making only 10% of my salary, but I had been completely sure the income would grow if My spouse and i started putting more work on them. And in fact within the first year my sites were already making more than what I earned with my previous job.

 

For those who have a wife, kids and other financial responsibilities, nevertheless, the picture changes. In this case, you need to wait until your website is near completion before you quit your regular job. On top of that I would also encourage you to diversify your earnings resources on the web.

 

Intended for example, consider launching a new website on the different niche and with a different business model, or launch an email list and promote affiliate offers to your subscribers. Developing money from just one website is a risky situation because things change very fast on the Net. 1 day your traffic is booming, the other it might be gone.

 

Finally, it’s also a good idea to make a financial cushion before you make the switch. That is, save money to hide around one year of your expenses, so even if things go really incorrect you’ll have one yr to figure it.

 

What about you guys, how much were you making when you jumped to work full time on the net (or how much are you planning to if you’ll still need to do it)?

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Make Money by Self-Publishing

 

Believe it or not, some authors have made money by self-publishing their books.

 

Back in the day, self-publishing was lumped together with vanity publishing. They both got your name printed as the author of a book, but without the benefit of the publishing industry’s support systems. You got no editing, probably a bad cover, and a reputation for self-indulgence.

 

However, things are changing. More and more people are finding that self-publishing lets them get on the market without having to be tied to the publishing industry’s strings. Authors in niche genres or those who would be rejected due to not fitting a traditional mould can self-publish and make money.

 

One of the keys here is quantity. The more books you have, the higher the chances of you generating word of mouth. However, numbers alone won’t be enough.

 

Obviously, you still need a book that’s worth reading. This is critical since there is a glut of mediocre to bad books in this field. Sometimes, publishers reject manuscripts simply because they’re bad. Having a good book is important since it makes you stand out.

 

You also need to be easily found. “Searchability” is important, and is a crucial part of marketing the book. It won’t matter if you have Pulitzer-quality writing if its audience can’t find your book. This is a very complicated thing, and will usually be the snag that defines success and failure.

 

Despite all the work involved, self-publishing can be a rewarding home-based business. Once the book is out, and the marketing is done, you’re finished. The heavy lifting is done already, and the sales will roll in, especially if you have strong word of mouth.

 

It takes a lot of hard work and marketing, but it is possible to live off book sales. From there, your business becomes selling the book and making more.

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Best Jobs to Do From Home

There is no place like home.

 

For many people, this is a truth that defines their working experience. Thanks to the Internet, it is now easier than ever to find a job and generate a livable income without ever leaving the confines of one’s home.

Not all work-from-home tasks are made equal, though. Some can be much harder than their description suggests. There are some that don’t pay as much as they should for your efforts. There are also a few that just aren’t worth getting into because the niche isn’t big enough.

If you’re looking to start a home-based business, here are the fields that have the most potential.

Virtual assistants are becoming increasingly common.

The usual tasks involve answering emails, setting appointments, making follow-ups. Anything that an assistant does, barring physical tasks like picking up laundry. Sometimes, you also end up doing a little social media on the side. The work pays per hour, and good companies pay well.

Another field is transcription, though you’ll find this tends to get offshore a lot.

Transcription is listening to an audio file and writing it all down. You might get lectures, scripts, speeches, or even medical notes. In many cases, they don’t care about experience as long as you have a computer and a decent internet connection.

A surprising field is that of the website tester. Someone has to make sure they work, after all.

A website tester is quality assurance for the internet. Your job is to ensure all the links work and go to the right locations. You also make sure the site design is easy to navigate, that what you’re looking for is easy to find.

The common test only eats up about 15 minutes so that you can go through a lot of them in a single day.

There is also the online English teacher.

Students in places like Germany and South Korea study English. They need someone to practice it with, and they’d prefer someone fluent. The work usually involves talking to them, helping them with figures of speech, and some business-related linguistic skills.

The work isn’t so bad, but you need a stable connection. A webcam and good audio are required, too.

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